We conducted two searches. The first was sensitive and aimed to capture all pre-clinical studies explaining the reproductive endocrine effects of whole herbal extracts in PCOS or associated oligo/amenorrhoea and hyperandrogenism. The second search was specific and sought only clinical studies investigating herbal medicines revealed during the first search (for which a mechanism of effect had been demonstrated). We additionally searched, on a case by case basis for pre-clinical evidence for herbal medicines identified during the second search, but not included in the results of the first search. Clinical studies were excluded based on the absence of evidence for a mechanism of effect for the whole herbal extract in reproductive endocrinology associated with PCOS, oligo/amenorrhoea and hyperandrogenism. We used this approach to improve transparency and to limit confirmation bias for herbal medicines favoured by the authors in clinical practice.


was on a high dose of seroquel for schizoaffective (ended up going off and trying other antipsychotics) but basically i acted like a narcoleptic. i'd fall asleep in the middle of class without warning or i'd fall asleep during a ten min car ride. i was just constantly asleep and it wasnt a peaceful sleep either it was like dead sleep and i woke up feeling shitty. also like all antipsychotics make you gain weight but sometimes it's not more than 10 lbs or so so maybe between that and heroin thats why tuna's not gaining much weight?


If you’re overweight, many of symptoms will improve if you can lose just a little. Dropping just 5 to 10% of your body weight (9 to 18 pounds if you now weigh 180) can make your body more sensitive to insulin (reducing the insulin resistance behind PCOS), lead to more regular menstrual cycles, and could even help control severe acne and excess hair growth,1 according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).
The ultimate goal is to prevent metabolic disease. Metformin (1500 mg per day) compared to placebo in a prospective 12 wk randomized control trial decreased arterial stiffness (by peripheral pressure waveforms in the brachial artery) and endothelial function (measured by augmentation index). Metformin did not reduce HOMA-IR[82]. The study population was obese but young (mean age 30 years), demonstrating the ability to reduce CAD risk even in very young women. Metformin has reduced both carotid intimal media thickness and endothelin levels in obese PCOS women[83]. In many studies metformin has reduced both total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels[84-86], triglyceride levels[84] and increased HDL levels[87,88]. Animal studies have shown that acarbose given to insulin resistant rats decreased carotid intimal hyperplasia and blood flow velocities[89]. Taken as a whole, the ability of metformin (and likely other insulin sensitizing agents) to elicit an overall reduction in the risk for CAD may be easier than the ability to produce consistent measureable improvements.
Acne is common in the general population and in patients with PCOS. Hormonal contraceptives are first-line medications for treating acne associated with PCOS and can be used in conjunction with standard topical acne therapy (e.g., retinoids, antibiotics, benzoyl peroxide) or as monotherapy.19,34 Antiandrogens, spironolactone being the most common, can be added as second-line medications.19,34
Why treat IR in PCOS women? For many years only PCOS women with DM were treated. As the link between IGT and CAD became more apparent, many PCOS women with IGT were treated. We now understand that IR is often the first step in a progression to DM and CAD. Those who now advocate treatment for IR do so for the following reasons: reduction of insulin and androgen levels, prevention of IGT and DM, potential for improved ovulation, symptomatic improvement, prevention of MS[63]. Ultimately, secondary prevention in young women with identifiable and treatment precursor conditions is far more desirable and easier than treatment of these same women later in life with serious disease.
A su hija la han diagnosticado una afección llamada síndrome del ovario poliquístico ("PCOS", por sus siglas en inglés). El PCOS es un desequilibrio hormonal. Afecta los ovarios. Estos son los órganos que guardan los óvulos de la mujer. El PCOS posiblemente también altere el resto del cuerpo. Si se deja sin tratar, el PCOS puede ocasionar graves problemas de salud. El tratamiento no puede curar el problema, pero sí ayuda a reducir los síntomas y a evitar trastornos de salud.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
Janis King graduated cum laude from Florida State University in 2009 with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and worked as a registered nurse in medical-surgical nursing and critical care. She earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Florida State University in 2013 and has since been working in Endocrinology following graduation.  Janis is bilingual and fluent in the Spanish language as well.
PCOS son las siglas en inglés del síndrome de ovario poliquístico, una afección común en mujeres adolescentes y adultas. PCOS ocurre cuando hay un desequilibrio hormonal. Además de estrógeno (la principal hormona femenina), las mujeres también producen una pequeña cantidad de testosterona (la principal hormona masculina). Las muchachas y mujeres con PCOS producen un poco de testosterona adicional.
High levels of insulin. Insulin is a hormone that controls how the food you eat is changed into energy. Insulin resistance is when the body's cells do not respond normally to insulin. As a result, your insulin blood levels become higher than normal. Many women with PCOS have insulin resistance, especially those who have overweight or obesity, have unhealthy eating habits, do not get enough physical activity, and have a family history of diabetes (usually type 2 diabetes). Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes.
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