A total of 33 studies were included in this review. Eighteen pre-clinical studies reported mechanisms of effect and fifteen clinical studies corroborated pre-clinical findings, including eight randomised controlled trials, and 762 women with menstrual irregularities, hyperandrogenism and/or PCOS. Interventions included herbal extracts of Vitex agnus-castus, Cimicifuga racemosa, Tribulus terrestris, Glycyrrhiza spp., Paeonia lactiflora and Cinnamomum cassia. Endocrine outcomes included reduced luteinising hormone (LH), prolactin, fasting insulin and testosterone. There was evidence for the regulation of ovulation, improved metabolic hormone profile and improved fertility outcomes in PCOS. There was evidence for an equivalent effect of two herbal medicines and the pharmaceutical agents bromocriptine (and Vitex agnus-castus) and clomiphene citrate (and Cimicifuga racemosa). There was less robust evidence for the complementary combination of spirinolactone and Glycyrrhiza spp. for hyperandrogenism.
yeah, the constant nitpicking about things she can't help is annoying. people are desperate for milk so they'll try to make a topic out of everything. for example, that anon who was saying how gross her arm looks because it has stretch marks and loose skin. what's she supposed to do about that? shes a shitty person but i gaurentee none of the anons on this thread are perfect or even attractive enough to be such nitpickers

Women with PCOS have a normal uterus and healthy eggs. Many women with PCOS have trouble getting pregnant, but some women have no trouble at all. If you’re concerned about your fertility (ability to get pregnant) in the future, talk to your health care provider about all the new options available, including medications to lower your insulin levels or to help you ovulate each month.

Selection of herbal medicines for the management of PCOS often includes the combined prescription of Glycyrrhiza spp. and Paeonia lactiflora[72–75]. We found preliminary evidence for this combination for hyperandrogenism only, and the evidence was more robust for Glycyrrhiza spp. alone than when combined with Paeonia lactiflora. Comparatively, our findings for the combination of Peaonia lactiflora and Cinnamomum cassia demonstrated no change in androgen concentration, suggesting that the anti-androgen activity in the Glycyrrhiza spp. and Paeonia lactiflora combination more likely attributable to Glycyrrhiza spp. However our findings may be complicated by the aqueous extraction methods used in the Paeonia lactiflora and Cinnamomum cassia combination and the preclinical studies into the Glycorrhizza spp and Paeonia lactiflora combination. More research into the anti-androgen effects of the combination Glycyrrhiza spp. and Paeonia lactiflora is needed to clarify the anti-androgen mechanism particularly if this herbal combination remains cornerstone herbal management for hyperandrogenism.
just saying, sometimes on payday i head to the drugstore and buy one or two nyx lip products along with other stuff and they're just under 10 euro a pop here. Like on payday I feel pretty dodgy for paying 30 euro for like three lip products. I imagine even her dad would feel weird about spending that much money on something so stupid when he could get her groceries or actual useful bathing products instead.
Píldoras anticonceptivas orales. Contienen una combinación de hormonas femeninas. Estas pastillas pueden ayudar a normalizar el equilibrio de las hormonas y reducir o eliminar los síntomas. Esto reduce el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio para cuando la joven sea mayor. (No es necesario que una adolescente mantenga relaciones sexuales activas para tomar anticonceptivos orales).
An animal study compared the effectiveness of Cinnamomum cassia and the pharmaceutical Metformin on hormone concentration in rats with PCOS [48] (Table 1). Both interventions demonstrated significant improvements compared to controls at 15 days for measures of testosterone ng/ml (control 0.747 ± 0.039; metformin 0.647 ± 0.027; Cinnamomum cassia 0.625 ± 0.029); LH ng/ml (control 7.641 ± 0.267; metformin 6.873 ± 0.214; Cinnamomum cassia 6.891 ± 0.221) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (control 10.018 ± 0.217; metformin 7.067 ± 0.184 Cinnamomum cassia 8.772 ± 0.196) (p < 0.05) [48]. The metabolic effects for Cinnamomum cassia were further demonstrated in overweight women with oligo/amenorrhoea and PCOS in a placebo controlled RCT [66] (Table 2). However, although the RCT had low risks for bias, it was a pilot study primarily investigating feasibility. Outcomes were promising for metabolic profile in PCOS however the sample size was small and the authors recommended further studies.

Three RCTs corroborate the positive fertility effects for Cimicifuga racemosa in women with PCOS, used in conjunction and when compared with the pharmaceutical Clomiphene citrate (clomiphene), [65, 68, 71] (Table 2). Results were reported for 441 women and show improved pregnancy rates when Cimicifuga racemosa was added to clomiphene during one menstrual cycle. In a study including women with PCOS (n = 147), pregnancy rates for the group receiving combined therapy (clomiphene 150 mg plus Cimicifuga racemosa 20 mg per day (Klimadynon®)) were 43.3% compared to 20.3% for women receiving only clomiphene [65] (Table 2). In another study using similar methodology (n = 100) pregnancy rates were 34.8% for the group treated with Cimicifuga racemosa plus clomiphene compared to 17.2% for women treated with clomiphene alone [68] (Table 2). Another study included women with PCOS and infertility (n = 100) compared Cimicifuga racemosa (Klimadynon®) and clomiphene over three months for hormone concentrations and pregnancy rates. Pregnancy rates were higher in the women in taking Cimicifuga racemosa compared to clomiphene, 14% and 8% respectively; however differences were not statistically significant. This study found significant effects for lowered luteinising hormone for women with PCOS receiving Cimicifuga racemosa compared to clomiphene (p = 0.007) [67]. Findings from clinical studies concur with laboratory and animal studies; however potential risks for bias include performance and collection bias due to lack of blinding (Table 2).


Women with PCOS have a normal uterus and healthy eggs. Many women with PCOS have trouble getting pregnant, but some women have no trouble at all. If you’re concerned about your fertility (ability to get pregnant) in the future, talk to your health care provider about all the new options available, including medications to lower your insulin levels or to help you ovulate each month.
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) indicate that lifestyle modifications such as weight loss and increased exercise in conjunction with a change in diet consistently reduce the risk of diabetes. This approach has been found to be comparable to or better than treatment with medication and should therefore be considered first-line treatment in managing women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). [2, 3] These modifications have been effective in restoring ovulatory cycles and achieving pregnancy in obese women with PCOS. Weight loss in obese women with PCOS also improves hyperandrogenic features.
Yeah, PCOS isn't period-dependent. That said, there are some suspicious blood stains in Luna's apartment that look like leaks (though they could possibly be explained by shooting up). Though since she does have PCOS, painful periods are one of those things she actually has grounds to complain about. Apparently they're often excruciating beyond belief with the condition.
I've lived in pretty grimy situations in other times in my life where I couldn't control the common space or kitchen at all but I at least didn't let my bedroom or the bathroom get so gross that it looks like it could be on an episode of a haunted hoarder homes tv show. I'd like to find an old pic where they had a clean home/even just their bed and compare it to now but I don't think it's EVER been clean and I've been following her for more than 5 years. Sage- Blog.
About Blog Verity is the UK charity for women with PCOS and supports thousands of women living with polycystic ovary syndrome. Verity's mission is to improve the lives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) which we aim to do by: - Supporting and empowering women with PCOS - Improving the quality of, access to, and choice of treatments available.
PCOS stands for polycystic ovary syndrome. The exact cause of PCOS is unknown. What is known is that PCOS has to do with hormone imbalances. With PCOS, your body may have high amounts of two hormones: androgen and insulin. These hormonal issues can cause changes in your body’s ability to release an egg (ovulate) and can lead to irregular periods, ovarian cysts, trouble getting pregnant, and other symptoms.
Lifestyle modification and weight reduction reduce insulin resistance and can significantly improve ovulation. Therefore, lifestyle modification is first-line therapy for women who are overweight.37 A calorie-restricted diet is recommended for all patients with PCOS who are overweight. Weight loss has been shown to have a positive effect on fertility and metabolic profile.19,30 The Endocrine Society recommends clomiphene or letrozole (Femara) for ovulation induction. Recent studies suggest that letrozole is associated with higher live-birth rates and ovulation rates compared with clomiphene in patients with PCOS.29 The impact of metformin on fertility is controversial; although it was once believed to improve infertility, a 2012 Cochrane review concluded that it does not.38
Excess insulin. Insulin is the hormone produced in the pancreas that allows cells to use sugar, your body's primary energy supply. If your cells become resistant to the action of insulin, then your blood sugar levels can rise and your body might produce more insulin. Excess insulin might increase androgen production, causing difficulty with ovulation.
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