Hola, hace unos 6 años me detectaron SOP, me mandaron la píldora ya que no habia otro tipo de tratamiento, me lo diagnosticaron por mi falta de regla y exceso de bello. Hace como unos 6 meses deje la píldora para ver como reaccionaba mi cuerpo, no reacciono bien, volvi a las reglas irregulares y ahora llevo 3 meses sin que me baje. vi vuestra pag de casualidad, y quisiera saber si tomando vuestras pastillas se regulara de forma natural la regla y si hay posiblidad de que baje.
On rare instances, if I'm in a dire hurry (of the 'ward rounds start in five minutes, I haven't had a single bite to eat since yesterday 1600 and my blood sugar is tanking like Luna's mu opioid receptors' kind), and the person in front of me is taking utter eternities to count out $3.50 for a shitty sandwich or whatever the fuck they bought, I sometimes just pay for my shit and theirs so that I can go to work and listen to the Munchie crop of the day. So I've known a few people who try to game people in a hurry by doing this counting out cash trick on them. At the same time I have been pretty dubious of Luna's stories and I think that almost all the time, it's a cover for stealing.

Metformina. La metformina se utiliza normalmente para tratar la diabetes tipo 2 y puede mejorar los síntomas del SOP en algunas mujeres. No está aprobada por la FDA para tratar los síntomas del SOP. La metformina optimiza la capacidad de la insulina para disminuir el azúcar en sangre y además puede reducir los niveles de insulina y andrógeno. Luego de varios meses de uso, la metformina puede ayudar a reactivar la ovulación, pero normalmente solo tiene un efecto mínimo en el acné y en el vello excesivo en el rostro o cuerpo. Estudios recientes demuestran que la metformina puede tener otros efectos positivos, como la disminución de la masa corporal y la optimización de los niveles de colesterol.


Moghetti P, Castello R, Negri C, et al. Metformin effects on clinical features, endocrine and metabolic profiles, and insulin sensitivity in polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 6-month trial, followed by open, long-term clinical evaluation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Jan. 85(1):139-46. [Medline]. [Full Text].
What you're talking about actually exists - it's called loperamide or Imodium, a widespread drug that exerts an effect only on the mu opioid receptors in the myenteric plexus. It cannot cross the blood-brain barrier. On the other hand, if you want an analgesic, you will have to cross the blood-brain barrier. With cannabinoles, you have different affinities and activities acting on different systems, while for an opioid analgesic the same process that gives the addictive rush. From a purely neurochemical perspective, the difference is that for cannabinoids, the addictive-euphoric and the pain-relieving effects take place on different receptors and it's possible to isolate cannabinoids that have no or little psychoactive effects while for opioids, the effect that gives pain relief is exactly the same as that responsible for addiction. Some opioids have a relatively slow absorption or they can be packaged as an extended release pill that keeps it from hitting the opioid receptors hard and fast. This will prevent it from having the addictive rush that causes compulsive redosing and addiction. But any systemically administered opioid that kills pain will also be at least a little addictive and euphoric. Hope that helps.
Acne is common in the general population and in patients with PCOS. Hormonal contraceptives are first-line medications for treating acne associated with PCOS and can be used in conjunction with standard topical acne therapy (e.g., retinoids, antibiotics, benzoyl peroxide) or as monotherapy.19,34 Antiandrogens, spironolactone being the most common, can be added as second-line medications.19,34
About Blog Verity is the UK charity for women with PCOS and supports thousands of women living with polycystic ovary syndrome. Verity's mission is to improve the lives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) which we aim to do by: - Supporting and empowering women with PCOS - Improving the quality of, access to, and choice of treatments available.
The most common form of treatment for PCOS is the birth control pill; however, other kinds of hormonal therapy may include the “vaginal ring” and “the patch”. Even if you’re not sexually active, birth control pills may be prescribed because they contain the hormones that your body needs to treat your PCOS. Birth control pills (either taken continuously or in cycles) can:

PCOS is genetic and presents differently in each woman of childbearing age. For some women, symptoms emerge shortly after they begin menstruating. Others may not show signs of the disorder until later in life, or after substantial weight gain, and many don’t receive a diagnosis until they are struggling to get pregnant. A community-based prevalence study published in 2010 found that approximately 70 percent of the 728 women in the cohort had PCOS, but had no pre-existing diagnosis.  
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have menstrual disorders caused by the absence of ovulation. About 20% of women will not ovulate on clomiphene citrate, the primary treatment option. These women can be treated with a surgical procedure like laparoscopic electrocautery of the ovaries or by ovulation induction with gonadotrophins or gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH). In normal menstrual cycles, GnRH is released in a regular pulsatile interval. A portable pump can be used to mimic this pulse to help these women to ovulate and hopefully to get pregnant. The review of trials did not find enough evidence to show the effectiveness of pulsatile GnRH in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

It’s important to follow-up regularly with your health care provider and make sure you take all the medications prescribed to regulate your periods and lessen your chance of getting diabetes or other health problems. Because you have a slightly higher chance of developing diabetes, your health care provider may suggest that you have your blood sugar tested once a year, or have a glucose challenge test every few years. Quitting smoking (or never starting) will also improve your overall health. Because you have a higher chance of developing diabetes, your health care provider may suggest having a:
High levels of androgens. Androgens are sometimes called "male hormones," although all women make small amounts of androgens. Androgens control the development of male traits, such as male-pattern baldness. Women with PCOS have more androgens than normal. Higher than normal androgen levels in women can prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg (ovulation) during each menstrual cycle, and can cause extra hair growth and acne, two signs of PCOS.
×